Read PDF The Day When I Was Born - FULLY ILLUSTRATED (Babys Unspoken Stories Book 1)

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The World is My Oyster. New York N. Hot Stuff. The sixties Book Review. New York Magazine 19 jul. Hard Case. The Good Earth came out 8 years before Steinbeck's masterpiece and yet my biggest wonder is why the Good Earth isn't better known, more well known, than Steinbeck.


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Is it because it happens to Chinese characters rather than Okies from Oklahoma? Let's let that question pass on by for a moment This is one hell of a classic. Let's let that question pass on by for a moment because this book deserves to stand on its own worth.

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The Earth is indeed the source of all wealth Some, sure, but most of the sorrow in these pages are created by those who do not understand or work the land. This is an important point. As important as that in Candide, but more poignant, emotional, and effective in this novel. High praise? I think so. And well deserved. I will like classics of all types for many different reasons, but some are much more impactful to me than others.

This one has that punch. Glorious, wonderful, sad, and so cruel. Life, with tragedy and small bits of joy here and there This ought to be on the required reading lists except for one small point Aug 01, Heather rated it it was amazing Shelves: my-absolute-favorites.


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When the earth suffers, women suffer-- when women suffer the earth suffers. I think this is what Buck captured so beautifully in her book. She is a brilliant feminist writer! Through her character O-lan, Buck makes the argument that all of man's in the story Wang-lung increase and prosperity comes because of his reliance on the "good earth", which refers not only to his land but also to his good woman.

Virginia Woolf

Without his woman he would have had none of the prosperity he enjoys! The tragedy is that he When the earth suffers, women suffer-- when women suffer the earth suffers. The tragedy is that he doesn't appreciate what he has and the woman suffers. My heart just ached for O-lan and she reminded me that so many woman in the world live similar lives. So many women bring forth fruit, raise it and cultivate it, in silence. They are trampled on, destroyed and unappreciated. Life would cease to exist without the earth, just as life would cease to exist without women.

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View all 4 comments. Apr 16, Jeana rated it really liked it Shelves: classics. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is a hard one to rate. I found the book difficult to read emotionally, but knew all the while that it was brilliant.

It was sad to see how Wang Lung's obsession with land ruined his potential for happiness. And it seemed that with more money came more difficult problems. The cycle of the rich House of Hwang turning into the farmer's house-with all its disgusting rich-people habits--was the most brilliant part of all.

And it began with him buying that bit of land even before all the This book is a hard one to rate. And it began with him buying that bit of land even before all the real problems began. I guess I should have realized this was a problem for him when he chose to use his meagre earnings to buy more land than save to feed his little family. I really despised Wang Lung, while I loved O-lan. How could he not have loved her for what she had given to him, so humbly and silently? Couldn't he find her beauty despite her physical appearance?

After O-lan died, I seriously wanted Wang Lung to suffer. I was hoping his house would be robbed like the rich houses that were pillaged by robbers "when the rich get too rich. While his sons caused him nothing but trouble. There is so much to mention here, I feel like I should have taken notes.

Things Unspoken

But I feel that this is definitely a book worth reading, although it was hard. Jan 26, Adrienne rated it really liked it. I couldn't put this book down. It was very informative about pre-revolutionary Chinese culture. But even more than that, it was an interesting emotional journey.

In the beginning, Wang Lung's character seems so simple and kinda static, albeit respectable. But as the novel progresses, his character becomes more and more complex, more and more human. It was hard for me to really define my opinion of him when it was all over. It wasn't as simple as just hating him because there was also a part of I couldn't put this book down.

It wasn't as simple as just hating him because there was also a part of him that was good, even in the end. That's what makes him human.

leondumoulin.nl/language/science/culture-of-the-citrus.php I think that feeling is the result of the peek Buck gives us into Wang Lung's mind during difficult decisions. I think we all wanted to get more of O-lan. Obviously we all sympathize with her and, despite her unlikeability to pretty much everyone in the novel, she is extremely likeable and respectable to us as modern western readers. She was considered insignificant despite the fact that all of her contributions are arguably the most significant. As readers we were only allowed to see the surface of O-lan's character, just as everyone in her society saw--it's all they cared to see and really, it's all they believed there was.

I think it's very clever writing on Buck's part. Book club read 24, August What's left to say about a classic, a Pulitzer Prize winner, that hasn't already been said? Maybe nothing, but it is probably worth repeating just how wonderfully special it is. Had not read this before but saw the movie years ago, then about 10 years ago I picked up a paperback copy at a used book sale and didn't get around to reading it until a GR friend mentioned it recently as a book club option.

So my book club agreed to try it when no one else had any Book club read 24, August So my book club agreed to try it when no one else had any suggestions. This is about a farmer who loves what he does, feeling a connection to the land, feeling it in his bones, owning that land, providing for his family and the community through that land. Even though it's in a remote area of China, the messages are universal.

Buck doesn't give us any specific years in which this takes place, so it remains timeless. She gives us characters who some may not care much for, but whose interactions give us a full idea of life and living, struggling and thriving in early twentieth century China. The lives of women, class differences, traditional vs modern ways, the rich and the poor man. The story seems simple on surface, but the more I think about it the more I see. The first book in a trilogy that I do hope to continue on with. View all 8 comments.

Feb 08, Clif Hostetler rated it liked it Shelves: novel.